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In this video by the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Angola, a number of people testified to witnessing the fall of Manna and tasting it. Manna was the miracle food from heaven that the Israelites ate on their way to the promised land.
The video begins with the testimony of a woman attacked by armed robbers. However, the Manna story begins at 3:20 minutes into the video.

I received this pictures from someone who visited the Nigerian Police Academy in Wudil, Kano. The sender explained how several projects have been abandoned, some since 2009. Buildings like the library, faculty, hostels, cadet parade ground, dining hall, and much more have been abandoned.

I was really shocked when one of the pictures shows where students defecate in the open bush because of lack of functioning toilets.

Where students defecate in the bush near campus

It’s an old news, but I still celebrate this woman for making us proud! Olufunmilola F. Obe was the Deputy Inspector of police in New York (NYPD), but now she has been promoted to the rank of Inspector.

Obe began her career with the New York City Police Department in June, 1992 as a Cadet assigned to the 24 Precinct. In February 1994, she was sworn in as a New York City police officer and assigned to the 17 Precinct. 
She has also served at the 19 and 50 Precincts, as well as the Property Clerk Division. She was promoted to Sergeant in December 2000, Lieutenant in July 2005, Captain in September 2008, and Deputy Inspector in June 2012.
Currently the Commanding Officer at the 28 Precinct, Obe has also commanded Police Service Area B. She also served as Executive Officer of the 19, 25 and 34 Precincts.
Inspector Obe holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from The City College of New York and a Master of Public Administration from Marist College. She is a 2014 graduate of the Police Management Institute at Columbia University. 
Obe has been married for 19 years, and togethe with her husband Peter, she has three children, Ayodele, Tola and Timi.

This is the account of friends who were with 27-year-old Oluwabukola Charity Dazan till her last moments. She was reportedly the only child her parents had left.

On Tuesday, she finished writing her French Shorthand practical exam around 2:00 p.m. when she suddenly fell ill. When she got to the school clinic, she wasn’t allowed beyond the lobby, and she was given paracetamol (pain killer, equivalent of Ibuprofen).


“They simply gave her paracetamol or something and refused to let her into the sick ward where there are beds she could sleep on,” the student said.

“Dazan was not allowed past the clinic’s lobby. I wasn’t surprised. That’s how they do here. They are pathetic.”
An hour after her friends took her back to her hostel, she complained of being very tired and having pains in both hands. It was 8 pm, and her friends rushed her back to the school clinic.
“They just checked her and gave her some drugs again. But did not admit her into the sick ward. She was again restricted to the lobby. They said there were no available beds inside the sick ward,” a student said.
When she was released from the school hospital around 10:00 p.m, the students said she could neither stand nor walk. Nevertheless, the clinic did not admit her, but decided to drive her to her room in their ambulance, basically a bus. Some of her friends bathed her. But she kept complaining of pains around 11 pm.

So they took her back to the school clinic, and this time, the clinic referred her to the Federal Medical Center (FMC) in Ebute-Metta, driving her there in their ambulance with a letter from the chief doctor at Yaba Tech medical center.

When she was released from the school hospital around 10:00 p.m, the students said she could neither stand nor walk. Nevertheless, the clinic did not admit her, but decided to drive her to her room in their ambulance, basically a bus. Some of her friends bathed her. But she kept complaining of pains around 11 pm.
So they took her back to the school clinic, and this time, the clinic referred her to the Federal Medical Center (FMC) in Ebute-Metta, driving her there in their ambulance with a letter from the chief doctor at Yaba Tech medical center.
“FMC officials told us they won’t attend to Dazan until N35,000 admission fee and some other registration fee are paid. Everything totalled approximately N43,000,” said a student. “We pleaded with FMC to begin treating Dazan as we would go out in search of the money. But FMC refused and told us to take Dazan’s weak body along on our fundraising hustle. I was particularly shocked by their statement and body language. They didn’t act like they had children or were human for that matter
“So we drove Dazan back to YabaTech to raise the money. The chief doctor at YabaTech gave us N10,000. Dazan’s fellowship (YabaTech Cherubim and Seraphim, C&S, Fellowship) raised N25,000. Dazan’s roommates raised N3,000.
“With N38,000 raised, we drove Dazan back to FMC. A nurse from our medical center was with us.

 When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 

“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me’”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me’”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me’”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.

 When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 

“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me’”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
“Before we returned, FMC had taken Dazan into the ward and ran some tests on her. That’s what they told us when we returned to present the receipts. It was around 2:00 a.m. on Wednesday now. We were told the test result was ‘paperwhite’.

When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me’”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
“Before we returned, FMC had taken Dazan into the ward and ran some tests on her. That’s what they told us when we returned to present the receipts. It was around 2:00 a.m. on Wednesday now. We were told the test result was ‘paperwhite’.

“They said they couldn’t locate Dazan’s veins. So there was no way they could pass any water or blood into her bloodstream. In fact, they said she had no single drop of blood left in her body. We were wondering what this could mean.
“When the medics at FMC returned to Dazan’s bed, they found her dead. That’s how this evil system took our friend away. Just like that. They said only the N600 money for card would be refunded. The rest wasn’t refundable.
“FMC also refused to issue Dazan’s death certificate because she didn’t stay up to 24 hours at the facility,” another student said.
“Dazan’s dead body was driven back to YabaTech medical center some minutes after 2:00 a.m.
“However, YabaTech medics left her corpse in the bus and failed to wash or dress her. She had defecated on herself in her last moments. They left her there, in her mess, till daybreak.
“It was around 8:00 a.m. when one of us who didn’t follow us to FMC went looking for Dazan. She thought her classmate was still alive.”
This is what she said: 
I didn’t know she had died. I went to the medical center and searched the sick ward but couldn’t find Dazan on any of the beds. I didn’t know what to think. The medical center’s bus was parked inside the premises. On my way out, I noticed there were flies in and around the ambulance. There were lots of flies. That was when it hit me. I moved closer to the bus and took a look. Dazan was there, dead. She was smelling. She was swollen. The nurses didn’t take care of the body. When the security officers knew what I had discovered, they rushed towards me and dragged me away. I was shocked.
Dazan was, on Wednesday, buried at Atan Cemetery near the University of Lagos. Her burial was well attended by YabaTech students many of whom barricaded University Road.The students complained that “Whatever you say is wrong with you, all they do is give you paracetamol, yet we pay over N3,000 for medicals every session. Multiply that by 45,000 of us.”
Dazan’s father reportedly lost his legs in an accident two years ago, and her mother recently suffered stroke. Her parents live in Badagry, Lagos, they were originally from Cotonou in Benin Republic. 
I can’t believe this, but Naira has fallen so bad that it hit 400 against a dollar. Fresh pressure on the naira since last week Thursday has seen the currency fall further from N318.

Financial experts linked the persistent fall of the Naira to panic buying of the dollar and other major hard currencies by importers, individuals and businessmen.

Tumbling global oil prices have battered Africa’s top crude exporter, with foreign exchange reserves down to an 11-year low of $27.85 billion by Feb. 11.

A GTB customer stripped down to his boxers in protest, after asserting that N150,000 disappeared in his account with no explanation. According to him, he has complained for more than a month without any explanation or refund from the bank. 
After a month and few days, he resorted into stripping in the bank where onlookers filmed him.  This is scary, I also bank with GTB, chei!

Following the controversies and several online protests about the ridiculous 2016 Nigerian budget, President Muhammadu Buhari has ordered the complete purge of the Budget Office, in hope of  
cleaning up the irregularities, repetitions, and discrepancies
in the budget. The president said the budget has attracted a huge embarrassment  to his government.

So far, the President has fired the Director-General of the Budget office, Yahaya Gusau, replacing him with  Tijjani Mohammed Abdullahi.
An insider confirmed the president’s plans to fire more budget officials, while the rest would be posted out of the office. Some officials in the Budget Office were described as “budget mafia” and accused of sabotaging the budget process. 
Below is my take on the budget after taking a critical look:

This week on KIRWA, Adeola takes a critical look at Nigeria’s National 2016 budget presented by President Muhammadu Buhari.

Adeola also gives an update on Bukola Saraki’s court case.

Also, Adeola tells the inspiring story of Olajumoke, a bread seller in Agege, Nigeria, who became a super model overnight.

From Tanzania, Adeola brings you the accomplishments of the newly elected President, Dr. John Magufuli, also known as the bulldozer. 

In this episode of KIRWA, about 80 people were burnt to death by Boko Haram in Dalori. Meanwhile, Nigerian president says the terrorist group was trying to embarrass his government.

Also, is it true that former President Goodluck Jonathan released $35 million to rig Ekiti State election? Watch to find out.

In Uganda, President Yoweri Museveni wants to run for 5th term in the coming presidential election of February 18th.

Adeola also features a Kenyan unemployed graduate who became a millionaire by practicing farming.

It started out like any normal day for Jumoke Orisaguna. The 27-year-old mother of two was hawking bread like she’s done for years, hoping to make between N300-N500 to support her family. She however was walking by just as the famous photographer TY Bello captured Nigerian-British rapper Tinie Tempah in a photo shoot. 

Instead of talking about Tempah, everyone wanted to know who the elegant bread seller was. 

TY Bello searched for Jumoke until she found her and had a photo shoot with her. Her picture later graced the front page of This Day Style magazine. Today, Jumoke has been signed to modeling contracts and internships.  

This week, Adeola celebrates 200th episode of KIRWA!

She also examines former President Jonathan’s statements on the heated #DasukiGate.

To inspire you, Adeola features two young men making cars in Northern Nigeria, and a self-made female millionaire in Kenya.

Adeola also clears the air on the rumor about marrying two wives in Eritrea among other stories.

I’m hoping this story would inspire you to dare to dream and believe in your ability to achieve your dreams. 
Popular American author Octavia E. Butler did just that by writing in her journal years in advance how she wanted her life to be like. She was very specific, and everything she wrote came to pass.

Born in 1947, Butler kept journals of her dreams. The following is one of such entries which she wrote in 1988, recently discovered between the covers of a notebook in the Huntington Library, archived among many of the other texts she kept throughout her career. 

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By including phrases like “I will find the way to do this. So be it! See to it!” tells me she was determined to achieve her goals no matter what, she believed she could, and she did. 
Needless to say, she authored several novels including, Mind of My MindClay’s Ark, and the widely recognized, Kindred, she went on to receive a spot among the best-seller lists and be a renowned novelist with awards and accolades including becoming the first science- fiction writer to receive a grant from the MacArthur foundation, a Lifetime Achievement award, and induction into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. And these affirmations proved to be the catalyst she needed.
Today let her story inspire you to dream and dream big!

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A new app can now document and hopefully reduce racial
profiling during traffic stops in America. The developer Mbye Njie, originally from Gambia, says he
developed the app
because he has been racially profiled by the police, and like
many people of color,  he is fed up and decided to do something about it.

Njie started working on the app after the death of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old African-American teenager that was shot and killed by the police in Ferguson. With one click, the app alerts three of your contacts once you’re
stopped by the police, and with another click, it records both audio and video
of your encounter and sends it to your three trusted contacts. The 34-year-old is an insurance salesman by day. He hopes his app will prevent officers from
abusing their power and getting away with it. You can reach Njie on Twitter @mnjie.



Here is Njie explaining in more details how the app works:

Passengers on an Aero Contractor plane celebrate during a final landing in Abuja after what could have been a plane crash.
The plane traveling from Lagos was attempting to land in Abuja when the sand storm hit. Passengers were first diverted to Kano
to land. They later proceeded to Abuja when the weather was better. A passenger on board Lola E. blogged about her experience.

Below is an example of sand storm in Abuja: