Thursday, February 18, 2016

Pay before treament: Tragic tale of how another Nigerian student dies due to hospital negligence

This is the account of friends who were with 27-year-old Oluwabukola Charity Dazan till her last moments. She was reportedly the only child her parents had left.

On Tuesday, she finished writing her French Shorthand practical exam around 2:00 p.m. when she suddenly fell ill. When she got to the school clinic, she wasn't allowed beyond the lobby, and she was given paracetamol (pain killer, equivalent of Ibuprofen).

“They simply gave her paracetamol or something and refused to let her into the sick ward where there are beds she could sleep on,” the student said.
“Dazan was not allowed past the clinic’s lobby. I wasn’t surprised. That’s how they do here. They are pathetic."
An hour after her friends took her back to her hostel, she complained of being very tired and having pains in both hands. It was 8 pm, and her friends rushed her back to the school clinic.
“They just checked her and gave her some drugs again. But did not admit her into the sick ward. She was again restricted to the lobby. They said there were no available beds inside the sick ward," a student said.
When she was released from the school hospital around 10:00 p.m, the students said she could neither stand nor walk. Nevertheless, the clinic did not admit her, but decided to drive her to her room in their ambulance, basically a bus. Some of her friends bathed her. But she kept complaining of pains around 11 pm.
So they took her back to the school clinic, and this time, the clinic referred her to the Federal Medical Center (FMC) in Ebute-Metta, driving her there in their ambulance with a letter from the chief doctor at Yaba Tech medical center.

When she was released from the school hospital around 10:00 p.m, the students said she could neither stand nor walk. Nevertheless, the clinic did not admit her, but decided to drive her to her room in their ambulance, basically a bus. Some of her friends bathed her. But she kept complaining of pains around 11 pm.
So they took her back to the school clinic, and this time, the clinic referred her to the Federal Medical Center (FMC) in Ebute-Metta, driving her there in their ambulance with a letter from the chief doctor at Yaba Tech medical center.
“FMC officials told us they won’t attend to Dazan until N35,000 admission fee and some other registration fee are paid. Everything totalled approximately N43,000," said a student. "We pleaded with FMC to begin treating Dazan as we would go out in search of the money. But FMC refused and told us to take Dazan’s weak body along on our fundraising hustle. I was particularly shocked by their statement and body language. They didn’t act like they had children or were human for that matter
“So we drove Dazan back to YabaTech to raise the money. The chief doctor at YabaTech gave us N10,000. Dazan’s fellowship (YabaTech Cherubim and Seraphim, C&S, Fellowship) raised N25,000. Dazan’s roommates raised N3,000.
“With N38,000 raised, we drove Dazan back to FMC. A nurse from our medical center was with us.



 When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me'”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me'”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.

When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me'”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
 When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me'”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
“Before we returned, FMC had taken Dazan into the ward and ran some tests on her. That’s what they told us when we returned to present the receipts. It was around 2:00 a.m. on Wednesday now. We were told the test result was ‘paperwhite’.


When they returned, the doctors refused to treat Dazan until the due payment procedure has been followed and the students have receipt to prove it. 
“At this point, Dazan started saying albeit faintly ‘I’m dying, please help me. I’m dying. Help me'”
“‘Shut up and keep quite my friend’, a doctor shut her down.
“We split ourselves into two groups. Some went to pay the admission fee. The other group went to pay for drip and blood. Our nurse was with FMC staff and Dazan.
“Before we returned, FMC had taken Dazan into the ward and ran some tests on her. That’s what they told us when we returned to present the receipts. It was around 2:00 a.m. on Wednesday now. We were told the test result was ‘paperwhite’.


“They said they couldn’t locate Dazan’s veins. So there was no way they could pass any water or blood into her bloodstream. In fact, they said she had no single drop of blood left in her body. We were wondering what this could mean.
“When the medics at FMC returned to Dazan’s bed, they found her dead. That’s how this evil system took our friend away. Just like that. They said only the N600 money for card would be refunded. The rest wasn’t refundable.
“FMC also refused to issue Dazan’s death certificate because she didn’t stay up to 24 hours at the facility,” another student said.
“Dazan’s dead body was driven back to YabaTech medical center some minutes after 2:00 a.m.
“However, YabaTech medics left her corpse in the bus and failed to wash or dress her. She had defecated on herself in her last moments. They left her there, in her mess, till daybreak.
“It was around 8:00 a.m. when one of us who didn’t follow us to FMC went looking for Dazan. She thought her classmate was still alive.”
This is what she said: 
I didn’t know she had died. I went to the medical center and searched the sick ward but couldn’t find Dazan on any of the beds. I didn’t know what to think. The medical center’s bus was parked inside the premises. On my way out, I noticed there were flies in and around the ambulance. There were lots of flies. That was when it hit me. I moved closer to the bus and took a look. Dazan was there, dead. She was smelling. She was swollen. The nurses didn’t take care of the body. When the security officers knew what I had discovered, they rushed towards me and dragged me away. I was shocked.
Dazan was, on Wednesday, buried at Atan Cemetery near the University of Lagos. Her burial was well attended by YabaTech students many of whom barricaded University Road.The students complained that “Whatever you say is wrong with you, all they do is give you paracetamol, yet we pay over N3,000 for medicals every session. Multiply that by 45,000 of us."
Dazan's father reportedly lost his legs in an accident two years ago, and her mother recently suffered stroke. Her parents live in Badagry, Lagos, they were originally from Cotonou in Benin Republic. 

1 comment:

  1. I pray their children suffer the same fate..... evil people....Rest on dear.......


    #PEACEOUT

    ReplyDelete